Computer

Sunday Was the Hottest Day Ever Recorded On Earth, Scientists Say

Slashdot - 1 hour 22 min ago
On Sunday, global temperatures reached their highest levels in recorded history (source may be paywalled; alternative source), with a daily average of 17.09 degrees Celsius (62.76 degrees Fahrenheit). "The historic day comes on the heels of 13 straight months of unprecedented temperatures and the hottest year scientists have ever seen," adds the Washington Post, citing preliminary data from the Copernicus Climate Change Service. From the report: Though Sunday was only slightly warmer than the world's previous hottest day, Copernicus researchers noted, it was extraordinarily hotter than anything that came before. Before July 2023, Earth's daily average temperature record -- set in August 2016 -- was 16.8 degrees Celsius (62.24 degrees Fahrenheit). But in the past year, the global has exceeded that old record on 57 days. Scientists have been tracking global temperatures only for the past few centuries. Yet there is good reason to believe that Sunday was the hottest day on Earth since the start of the last Ice Age more than 100,000 years ago. Research from paleoclimate scientists -- who use tree rings, ice cores, lake sediments and other ancient material to understand past environments -- suggests that recent heat would have been all but impossible over the last stretch of geologic time. "We are in truly uncharted territory," Copernicus director Carlo Buontempo said in a statement. "And as the climate keeps warming, we are bound to see records being broken in future months and years. What is truly staggering is how large the difference is between the temperature of the last 13 months and the previous temperature records."

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DHS Has a DoS Robot To Disable Internet of Things 'Booby Traps' Inside Homes

Slashdot - 4 hours 52 min ago
An anonymous reader quotes a report from 404 Media's Jason Koebler: The Department of Homeland Security bought a dog-like robot that it has modified with an "antenna array" that gives law enforcement the ability to overload people's home networks in an attempt to disable any internet of things devices they have, according to the transcript of a speech given by a DHS official at a border security conference for cops obtained by 404 Media. The DHS has also built an "Internet of Things" house to train officers on how to raid homes that suspects may have "booby trapped" using smart home devices, the official said. The robot, called "NEO," is a modified version of the "Quadruped Unmanned Ground Vehicle (Q-UGV) sold to law enforcement by a company called Ghost Robotics. Benjamine Huffman, the director of DHS's Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers (FLETC), told police at the 2024 Border Security Expo in Texas that DHS is increasingly worried about criminals setting "booby traps" with internet of things and smart home devices, and that NEO allows DHS to remotely disable the home networks of a home or building law enforcement is raiding. The Border Security Expo is open only to law enforcement and defense contractors. A transcript of Huffman's speech was obtained by the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Dave Maass using a Freedom of Information Act request and was shared with 404 Media. [...] The robot is a modified version of Ghost Robotics' Vision 60 Q-UGV, which the company says it has sold to "25+ National Security Customers" and which is marketed to both law enforcement and the military. "Our goal is to make our Q-UGVs an indispensable tool and continuously push the limits to improve its ability to walk, run, crawl, climb, and eventually swim in complex environments," the company notes on its website. "Ultimately, our robot is made to keep our warfighters, workers, and K9s out of harm's way." "NEO can enter a potentially dangerous environment to provide video and audio feedback to the officers before entry and allow them to communicate with those in that environment," Huffman said, according to the transcript. "NEO carries an onboard computer and antenna array that will allow officers the ability to create a 'denial-of-service' (DoS) event to disable 'Internet of Things' devices that could potentially cause harm while entry is made."

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Hackers Leak Documents From Pentagon IT Services Provider Leidos

Slashdot - 6 hours 20 min ago
According to Bloomberg, hackers have leaked internal documents stolen from Leidos Holdings, one of the largest IT services providers of the U.S. government. Reuters reports: The company recently became aware of the issue and believes the documents were taken during a previously reported breach of a Diligent Corp. system it used, the report said, adding that Leidos is investigating it. The Virginia-based company, which counts the U.S. Department of Defense as its primary customer, used the Diligent system to host information gathered in internal investigations, the report added, citing a filing from June 2023. A spokesperson for Diligent said the issue seems to be related to an incident from 2022, affecting its subsidiary Steele Compliance Solutions. The company notified impacted customers and had taken corrective action to contain the incident in November 2022.

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Alphabet To Invest Another $5 Billion Into Waymo

Slashdot - 6 hours 57 min ago
During Alphabet's second-quarter earnings call today, Alphabet CFO Ruth Porat announced the organization will spend an additional $5 billion on its self-driving subsidiary, Waymo. "This new round of funding, which is consistent with recent annual investment levels, will enable Waymo to continue to build the world's leading autonomous driving technology company," said Porat. TechCrunch reports: Porat noted that Google will focus on improving overall efficiencies in its "other bets" segment, which includes innovative projects that are distinct from the tech giant's core search and advertising business. Other companies in this segment are Verily, Calico, Google Ventures and drone company Wing. "Waymo is an important example of this, with its technical leadership coupled with progress on operational performance," Porat continued. The executive noted that parent company Alphabet's 10-Q form, which has yet to be filed, will have more details.

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Indie Game Publisher Humble Games Reportedly Lays Off All Staff

Slashdot - 7 hours 37 min ago
Humble Games, the indie game publisher behind the popular pay-what-you-want "Humble Game Bundle," has laid off its entire staff of 36 people. However, the company says it is not shutting down and Humble Bundle will not be impacted. Instead, the job cuts are part of a restructuring of operations. GameSpot reports: In a statement shared with GameSpot, Humble Games confirmed that Humble Bundle will have "no impact on its operations. Additionally, ongoing and upcoming games from Humble Games will still move ahead and be published by the company. Humble Games is the publisher of many notable indie games, including Stray Gods, Bo: Path of the Teal Lotus, Chinatown Detective Agency, Ikenfell, Unpacking, Slay the Spire, and Midnight Fight Express, just to name a few. Humble Games is the separate publishing arm of digital storefront Humble Bundle. Both companies are owned by IGN Entertainment, but operate as a separate entities. Earlier this year, IGN Entertainment also bought video game websites Eurogamer, Rock Paper Shotgun, VG247, GamesIndustry.biz, and Dicebreaker from Gamer Network.

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The Kremlin Jails the Father of Russia's Internet

Slashdot - 8 hours 20 min ago
An anonymous reader quotes a report from the Center for European Policy Analysis (CEPA): Alexey Soldatov, a Russian Internet pioneer and a founder of the first Internet provider in the country, has been sentenced by a court to two years in a labor colony on charges of "abuse of power." Soldatov, 72, had been detained by a court in Moscow. He is terminally ill. Very few in Russia believe in the government charges against a man widely known as a Father of the Russian Internet -- and who is less well known as the father of Andrei Soldatov, one of this article's authors. Soldatov was accused of abuse of power when managing a pool of IP-addresses by an organization he had no position at. This legal absurdity was enough to see him imprisoned even though the court knew of Soldatov's illness, which meant the court had no legal right to pass a custodial sentence. His family believes that the decision is essentially a death sentence. The article details Soldatov's history and his pivotal role in creating the Relcom network, which connected Soviet research centers and established the Soviet Union's first link to the global internet in 1990. During the 1991 KGB coup attempt, Relcom remained operational, highlighting its role in bypassing traditional media control and connecting people both within the Soviet Union and globally.

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House Committee Calls On CrowdStrike CEO To Testify On Global Outage

Slashdot - 9 hours 2 min ago
According to the Washington Post (paywalled), the House Homeland Security Committee has called on the CrowdStrike CEO to testify over the major outage that brought flights, hospital procedures, and broadcasters to a halt on Friday. The outage was caused by a defective software update from the company that primarily affected computers runnings Windows, resulting in system crashes and "blue screen of death" errors. From the report: Republican leaders of the House Homeland Security Committee demanded that CrowdStrike CEO George Kurtz commit by Wednesday to appearing on Capitol Hill to explain how the outages occurred and what "mitigation steps" the company is taking to prevent future episodes. [...] Reps. Mark Green (R-Tenn.) and Andrew R. Garbarino (R-N.Y.), chairs of the Homeland Security Committee and its cybersecurity subcommittee, respectively, wrote in their letter that the outages "must serve as a broader warning about the national security risks associated with network dependency. Protecting our critical infrastructure requires us to learn from this incident and ensure that it does not happen again," the lawmakers wrote. CrowdStrike spokesperson Kirsten Speas said in an emailed statement Monday that the company is "actively in contact" with the relevant congressional committees and that "engagement timelines may be disclosed at Members' discretion," but declined to say whether Kurtz will testify. The committee is one of several looking into the incident, with members of the House Oversight Committee and House Energy and Commerce Committee separately requesting briefings from CrowdStrike. But the effort by Homeland Security Committee leaders marks the first time the company is being publicly summoned to testify about its role in the disruptions. CrowdStrike has risen to prominence as a major security provider partly by identifying malicious online campaigns by foreign actors, but the outages have heightened concern in Washington that international adversaries could look to exploit future incidents. "Malicious cyber actors backed by nation-states, such as China and Russia, are watching our response to this incident closely," Green and Garbarino wrote. The outages, which disrupted agencies at the federal and state level, are also raising questions about how much businesses and government officials alike have come to rely on Microsoft products for their daily operations.

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Switzerland Now Requires All Government Software To Be Open Source

Slashdot - 10 hours 4 min ago
Switzerland has enacted the "Federal Law on the Use of Electronic Means for the Fulfillment of Government Tasks" (EMBAG), mandating open-source software (OSS) in the public sector to enhance transparency, security, and efficiency. "This new law requires all public bodies to disclose the source code of software developed by or for them unless third-party rights or security concerns prevent it," writes ZDNet's Steven Vaughan-Nichols. "This 'public money, public code' approach aims to enhance government operations' transparency, security, and efficiency." From the report: Making this move wasn't easy. It began in 2011 when the Swiss Federal Supreme Court published its court application, Open Justitia, under an OSS license. The proprietary legal software company Weblaw wasn't happy about this. There were heated political and legal fights for more than a decade. Finally, the EMBAG was passed in 2023. Now, the law not only allows the release of OSS by the Swiss government or its contractors, but also requires the code to be released under an open-source license "unless the rights of third parties or security-related reasons would exclude or restrict this." Professor Dr. Matthias Sturmer, head of the Institute for Public Sector Transformation at the Bern University of Applied Sciences, led the fight for this law. He hailed it as "a great opportunity for government, the IT industry, and society." Sturmer believes everyone will benefit from this regulation, as it reduces vendor lock-in for the public sector, allows companies to expand their digital business solutions, and potentially leads to reduced IT costs and improved services for taxpayers. In addition to mandating OSS, the EMBAG also requires the release of non-personal and non-security-sensitive government data as Open Government Data (OGD). This dual "open by default" approach marks a significant paradigm shift towards greater openness and practical reuse of software and data. Implementing the EMBAG is expected to serve as a model for other countries considering similar measures. It aims to promote digital sovereignty and encourage innovation and collaboration within the public sector. The Swiss Federal Statistical Office (BFS) is leading the law's implementation, but the organizational and financial aspects of the OSS releases still need to be clarified.

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EU To Investigate Delivery Hero, Glovo Over Food Delivery Cartel Concerns

Slashdot - 10 hours 22 min ago
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: The European Commission announced a formal investigation into Berlin-based food delivery giant Delivery Hero and its Spanish subsidiary, Glovo, on Tuesday, citing cartel concerns. The Commission will launch an in-depth probe into agreements between the online delivery firms to establish whether any anticompetitive activity has taken place. "The Commission is concerned that, before the takeover, Delivery Hero and Glovo may have allocated geographic markets and shared commercially sensitive information (e.g., on commercial strategies, prices, capacity, costs, product characteristics)," the Commission wrote in a press release. "The Commission is also concerned that the companies may have agreed not to poach each other's employees. These practices could have been facilitated by Delivery Hero's minority share in Glovo." The move follows unannounced raids conducted on the two companies' local offices in July 2022 and November 2023. From July 2018, Delivery Hero held a minority share in Glovo -- going on to acquire sole control in July 2022, per the Commission, which noted that this is the first investigation it has undertaken into anti-competitive agreements "that may have occurred in the context of a minority shareholding by one operator in a competitor." [...] Earlier this month, the German delivery giant warned investors it could ultimately face an antitrust fine of up to 400 million euros over the EU antitrust issue.

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China Is Getting Secretive About Its Supercomputers

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 23:21
For decades, American and Chinese scientists collaborated on supercomputers. But Chinese scientists have become more secretive as the U.S. has tried to hinder China's technological progress, and they have stopped participating altogether in a prominent international supercomputing forum. From a report: The withdrawal marked the end of an era and created a divide that Western scientists say will slow the development of AI and other technologies as countries pursue separate projects. The new secrecy also makes it harder for the U.S. government to answer a question it deems essential to national security: Does the U.S. or China have faster supercomputers? Some academics have taken it upon themselves to hunt for clues about China's supercomputing progress, scrutinizing research papers and cornering Chinese peers at conferences. Supercomputers have become central to the U.S.-China technological Cold War because the country with the faster supercomputers can also hold an advantage in developing nuclear weapons and other military technology. "If the other guy can use a supercomputer to simulate and develop a fighter jet or weapon 20% or even 1% better than yours in terms of range, speed and accuracy, it's going to target you first, and then it's checkmate," said Jimmy Goodrich, a senior adviser for technology analysis at Rand, a think tank. The forum that China recently stopped participating in is called the Top500, which ranks the world's 500 fastest supercomputers. While the latest ranking, released in June, says the world's three fastest computers are in the U.S., the reality is probably different.

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Hackers Shut Down Heating in Ukrainian City With Malware, Researchers Say

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 22:41
An anonymous reader shares a report: For two days in mid-January, some Ukrainians in the city of Lviv had to live without central heating and suffer freezing temperatures because of a cyberattack against a municipal energy company, security researchers and Ukrainian authorities have since concluded. On Tuesday, the cybersecurity company Dragos published a report with details about a new malware dubbed FrostyGoop, which the company says is designed to target industrial control systems -- in this particular case, specifically against a type of heating system controller. Dragos researchers wrote in their report that they first detected the malware in April. At that point, Dragos did not have more information on FrostyGoop apart from the malware sample, and believed it was only used for testing. Later on, however, Ukrainian authorities warned Dragos that they had found evidence that the malware was actively used in a cyberattack in Lviv during the late evening of January 22 through January 23. "And that resulted in the loss of heating to over 600 apartment buildings for almost 48 hours," said Mark "Magpie" Graham, a researcher at Dragos, during a call with reporters briefed on the report prior to its release. Dragos researchers Graham, Kyle O'Meara, and Carolyn Ahlers wrote in the report that "remediation of the incident took almost two days, during which time the civilian population had to endure sub-zero temperatures." This is the third known outage linked to cyberattacks to hit Ukrainians in recent years.

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'GitHub Is Starting To Feel Like Legacy Software'

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 22:01
Developer and librarian Misty De Meo, writing about her frustrating experience using GitHub: To me, one of GitHub's killer power user features is its blame view. git blame on the commandline is useful but hard to read; it's not the interface I reach for every day. GitHub's web UI is not only convenient, but the ease by which I can click through to older versions of the blame view on a line by line basis is uniquely powerful. It's one of those features that anchors me to a product: I stopped using offline graphical git clients because it was just that much nicer. The other day though, I tried to use the blame view on a large file and ran into an issue I don't remember seeing before: I just couldn't find the line of code I was searching for. I threw various keywords from that line into the browser's command+F search box, and nothing came up. I was stumped until a moment later, while I was idly scrolling the page while doing the search again, and it finally found the line I was looking for. I realized what must have happened. I'd heard rumblings that GitHub's in the middle of shipping a frontend rewrite in React, and I realized this must be it. The problem wasn't that the line I wanted wasn't on the page -- it's that the whole document wasn't being rendered at once, so my browser's builtin search bar just couldn't find it. On a hunch, I tried disabling JavaScript entirely in the browser, and suddenly it started working again. GitHub is able to send a fully server-side rendered version of the page, which actually works like it should, but doesn't do so unless JavaScript is completely unavailable. [...] The corporate branding, the new "AI-powered developer platform" slogan, makes it clear that what I think of as "GitHub" -- the traditional website, what are to me the core features -- simply isn't Microsoft's priority at this point in time. I know many talented people at GitHub who care, but the company's priorities just don't seem to value what I value about the service. This isn't an anti-AI statement so much as a recognition that the tool I still need to use every day is past its prime. Copilot isn't navigating the website for me, replacing my need to the website as it exists today. I've had tools hit this phase of decline and turn it around, but I'm not optimistic. It's still plenty usable now, and probably will be for some years to come, but I'll want to know what other options I have now rather than when things get worse than this.

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US Opens Investigation Into Delta After Airline Cancels Thousands of Flights

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 21:21
The US transportation department said on Tuesday it was opening an investigation into Delta Air Lines after the carrier canceled more than 5,000 flights since Friday as it struggles to recover from a global cyber outage that snarled airlines worldwide. From a report: While other carriers have been able to resume normal operations, Delta has continued to cancel hundreds of flights daily because of problems with its crew scheduling system. Since Friday Delta has been cancelling 30% or more of its flights daily through Monday, axing 444 flights on Tuesday, or 12% of its schedule as of 11.00am and delaying another 590, or 16%, according to FlightAware, after cancelling 1,150 on Monday. The transportation secretary, Pete Buttigieg, said on Tuesday the investigation was to "ensure the airline is following the law and taking care of its passengers during continued widespread disruptions ... Our department will leverage the full extent of our investigative and enforcement power to ensure the rights of Delta's passengers are upheld." Delta said it was in receipt of the USDOT notice of investigation and was fully cooperating. "Delta teams are working tirelessly to care for and make it right for customers impacted by delays and cancellations as we work to restore the reliable, on-time service they have come to expect from Delta," the airline said.

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AI Is Already Taking Jobs In the Video Game Industry

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 20:41
merbs writes: Video games -- and the people who make them -- are in trouble. An estimated 10,500 people in the industry were laid off in 2023 alone. This year, layoffs in the nearly $200 billion sector have only gotten worse, with studios axing what is believed to be 11,000 more, and counting. Microsoft, home of the Xbox and parent company to several studios, including Activision Blizzard, shuttered Tango Gameworks and Alpha Dog Games in May. All the while, generative AI systems built by OpenAI and its competitors have been seeping into nearly every industry, dismantling whole careers along the way. But gaming might be the biggest industry AI stands poised to conquer. Its economic might has long since eclipsed Hollywood's, while its workforce remains mostly nonunion. A recent survey from the organizers of the Game Developers Conference found that 49 percent of the survey's more than 3,000 respondents said their workplace used AI, and four out of five said they had ethical concerns about its use. "It's here. It's definitely here, right now," says Violet, a game developer, technical artist, and a veteran of the industry who has worked on AAA games for over a decade. "I think everyone's seen it get used, and it's a matter of how and to what degree. The genie is out of the bottle, Pandora's box is opened." The story adds: "At Activision, it was the same. 'A lot of 2D artists were laid off,' Noah says. The department was slashed. 'Remaining concept artists,' he claims, 'were then forced to use AI to aid in their work.' Employees, according to Noah, have been made to sign up for AI trainings, and its use is being promoted throughout the org."

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FTC Launches Probe Into 'Surveillance Pricing'

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 20:00
smooth wombat writes: The FTC has sent mandatory notices for information to eight companies it says engages in "surveillance pricing", the process by which prices are rapidly changed using AI based on data about customer behavior and characteristics. This process, the FTC claims, allows companies to charge different customers different prices for the same product. The list includes Mastercard, JPMorgan Chase, Accenture and consulting giant McKinsey. It also includes software firm Task, which counts McDonald's and Starbucks as clients; Revionics, which works with Home Depot, Tractor Supply and grocery chain Hannaford; Bloomreach, which services FreshDirect, Total Wine and Puma; and Pros, which was named Microsoft's internet service vendor of the year this year. "Firms that harvest Americans' personal data can put people's privacy at risk," FTC Chair Lina Khan said in a news release. "Now firms could be exploiting this vast trove of personal information to charge people higher prices."

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Meta Warns EU Regulatory Efforts Risk Bloc Missing Out on AI Advances

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 19:21
Meta has warned that the EU's approach to regulating AI is creating the "risk" that the continent is cut off from accessing cutting-edge services, while the bloc continues its effort to rein in the power of Big Tech. From a report: Rob Sherman, the social media group's deputy privacy officer and vice-president of policy, confirmed a report that it had received a request from the EU's privacy watchdog to voluntarily pause the training of its future AI models on data in the region. He told the Financial Times this was in order to give local regulators time to "get their arms around the issue of generative AI." While the Facebook owner is adhering to the request, Sherman said such moves were leading to a "gap in the technologies that are available in Europe versus" the rest of the world. He added that, with future and more advanced AI releases, "it's likely that availability in Europe could be impacted." Sherman said: "If jurisdictions can't regulate in a way that enables us to have clarity on what's expected, then it's going to be harder for us to offer the most advanced technologies in those places ... it is a realistic outcome that we're worried about."

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Apple Moves Forward With Foldable iPhone

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 18:42
Apple is advancing its plans for a foldable iPhone, with potential release as early as 2026, The Information reported Tuesday. The iPhone-maker has begun engaging with Asian suppliers for component production, the report added. The proposed device is said to feature a clamshell design, reminiscent of Samsung's Galaxy Z Flip series. The company faces considerable technical hurdles, including display crease issues and achieving optimal device thickness. Despite these challenges, the assignment of an internal codename, V68, suggests the project has progressed beyond the conceptual stage, the report added.

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Meta Launches Powerful Open-Source AI Model Llama 3.1

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 18:05
Meta has released Llama 3.1, its largest open-source AI model to date, in a move that challenges the closed approaches of competitors like OpenAI and Google. The new model, boasting 405 billion parameters, is claimed by Meta to outperform GPT-4o and Claude 3.5 Sonnet on several benchmarks, with CEO Mark Zuckerberg predicting that Meta AI will become the most widely used assistant by year-end. Llama 3.1, which Meta says was trained using over 16,000 Nvidia H100 GPUs, is being made available to developers through partnerships with major tech companies including Microsoft, Amazon, and Google, potentially reducing deployment costs compared to proprietary alternatives. The release includes smaller versions with 70 billion and 8 billion parameters, and Meta is introducing new safety tools to help developers moderate the model's output. While Meta isn't disclosing what all data it used to train its models, the company confirmed it used synthetic data to enhance the model's capabilities. The company is also expanding its Meta AI assistant, powered by Llama 3.1, to support additional languages and integrate with its various platforms, including WhatsApp, Instagram, and Facebook, as well as its Quest virtual reality headset.

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Intel Blames 13th, 14th Gen CPU Crashes on Software Bug

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 17:22
Intel has finally figured out why its 13th and 14th generation core desktop CPUs are repeatedly crashing. From a report: In a forum post on Monday, Intel said it traced the problem to faulty software code, which can trigger the CPUs to run at higher voltage levels. Intel examined a number of 13th and 14th gen desktop processors that buyers had returned. "Our analysis of returned processors confirms that the elevated operating voltage is stemming from a microcode algorithm resulting in incorrect voltage requests to the processor," it says. But in some bad news, Intel still needs a few more weeks to test its fix for the problem. "Intel is currently targeting mid-August for patch release to partners following full validation," it says. The company also recently confirmed that the issue doesn't extend to its mobile processors.

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Alexa Is in Millions of Households - and Amazon Is Losing Billions

Slashdot - Tue, 2024-07-23 16:44
Amazon's strategy to set prices low for Echo speakers and other smart devices, expecting them to generate income elsewhere in the tech giant, hasn't paid off [paywalled]. From a report: Amazon's Echo speakers are the type of business success companies don't want: a widely purchased product that is also a giant money loser. Chief Executive Andy Jassy is trying to plug that hole -- and move away from the Amazon accounting tactic that helped create it. When Amazon launched the Echo smart home devices with its Alexa voice assistant in 2014, it pulled a page from shaving giant Gillette's classic playbook: sell the razors for a pittance in the hope of making heaps of money on purchases of the refill blades. A decade later, the payoff for Echo hasn't arrived. While hundreds of millions of customers have Alexa-enabled devices, the idea that people would spend meaningful amounts of money to buy goods on Amazon by talking to the iconic voice assistant on the underpriced speakers didn't take off. Customers actually used Echo mostly for free apps such as setting alarms and checking the weather. "We worried we've hired 10,000 people and we've built a smart timer," said a former senior employee. As a result, Amazon has lost tens of billions of dollars on its devices business, which includes Echos and other products such as Kindles, Fire TV Sticks and video doorbells, according to internal documents and people familiar with the business. Between 2017 and 2021, Amazon had more than $25 billion in losses from its devices business, according to the documents. The losses for the years before and after that period couldn't be determined.

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